Friday, August 08, 2014

Sad News

     The raccoon kit died some time last night.  It was stretched out on the doormat when I opened the door.

     I debated how to address this -- flat lie, and say it was gone?  Sugar-coat it by remarking how peaceful it looked?  I don't know.  Wild animals are not pets and raccoons have adjusted quite well to living alongside humans; as a species, they're in no danger.  I don't like for them to suffer, but you can't save them all.  This little one didn't make it and I'm sorry for it.

14 comments:

B said...

Bummer.

Midwest Chick said...

Sorry to hear about the kit. Amazing how quick those little ones put their furry paws on our heartstrings.

LabRat said...

Much too young, yes. Raccoons are *amazingly* difficult to rescue as babies and keep alive.

I'm sorry. :(

Keads said...

Sorry!

Rob K said...

Whether it comes sooner or later, it is the fate of all.

I have this idea that if another species were to evolve to sentient peak-predator like humans, it would be racoons.

Roberta X said...

Yes, they may well be the B team.

Jennifer said...

I'm sorry too. I was pulling for the little guy

Tango Juliet said...

Bummer!

NAVIGATOR said...

MY SINCERE CONDOLENCES MAY YOU MEET
AGAIN AT THE RAINBOW BRIDGE

B said...

Looking at the pictures more closely, he/she may not have been weaned, and if Momma was hit by a car, the kit might well have died from dehydration or starvation...even though you put out food and water.

Sad, but Mother Nature is cruel.

Roberta X said...

Without going onto details, B, that does not appear to have been the cause of death.

OldTexan said...

Thank you for sharing your experience with the little kit and I am sorry he did not make it.

Sigman said...

It may have been sick when you found it. You did what you could for it and I believe it knows that. Give a peaceful burial.

Eric Wilner said...

Alas, life imitates Calvin & Hobbes (which I presume was in turn imitating life).
Out on a hike a few days ago, I spotted a not-quite-fledged baby hummingbird on the path. Momma bird was nowhere to be seen, nor was the nest (and in any event I wasn't carrying a stepladder). The critter was begging to be fed, but in addition to the stepladder I wasn't carrying a supply of hummingbird formula. I carefully moved the critter to the side of the trail, out of the way of careless feet, and told the folks at park headquarters about it... but, really, who can take care of a baby hummingbird, apart from its mother?