Tuesday, February 19, 2013

H&R Top-Break, A Photo

     Here's a first look at the graceful little plinker:

     --As a seven-shooter, it's still New York legal!  I wonder if the old Iver Johnson and High Standard 8 and 9 shot .22 revolvers are?

13 comments:

NAVIGATOR said...

YOUR H&R NEEDS A LICENSE IF IT IS CAPABLE OF FIRING FIXED AMMUNITION THAT
IS COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE OR IF YOU POSSESS NON COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE AMMUNITION SIMULTANEOUSLY WITH THE FIREARM SO SAYETH NYPD LICENSE BUREAU

Roberta X said...

Well, that; but when NY state outlawed "magazine capacity greater than seven rounds," did that include the cylinders of revolvers? Or should we be recreating the old French 21-shooter for sale in new York?

;)

Dave H said...

The new NY state law explicitly exempts attached .22 caliber tubular magazines from the 7-round limit. The implication is that other ammunition feeding devices are not exempt like they used to be. (Under the old law they had to be detachable to be restricted.)

Larger capacity devices holding up to 10 rounds are still legal if they were possessed before January 15 of this year, but may not be loaded with more than 7 rounds unless at a gun range, training facilty, or formal competition. (So I get to keep my Ruger Mark I magazines.)

There's also an exception for curios or relics that are at least 50 years old, as long as the ammunition feeding device cannot be used in a more recently manufactured gun. The device must be registered in that case. (Although a hadngun has to be registered anyway, because it's illegal to possess without a pistol license.)

Anyway, your Iver Johnson and High Standards are OK with a little paperwork here.

NAVIGATOR said...

THE GOVERNOR JUST OUTLAWED THE "EVIL BLACK RIFLE" AND "CLIPS" OF MORE THAN 7 ROUNDS (SO THAT STANDARD GARAND CLIPS WILL NEED SURGERY) IN NYC FOR MANY MOONS LAW ABIDING CITIZENS REGISTERED THEIR FIREARMS WITH THE ASSURANCE THAT THE CITY WOULD NEVER EVER TAKE AWAY LAW ABIDING CITIZENS FIREARMS EVER!!!!! SOME YEARS LATER
SEMI-AUTO RIFLES ARE VERBOTEN BOLT ACTIONS LIMITED TO 5 ROUNDS REVOLVERS AND PISTOLS ARE REGISTERED REGULATED REQUIRE PURCHASE ORDERS FOR PERMIT HOLDERS AND THE AMOUNT OF AMMUNITION ONE MAY KEEP ON HAND IS LIMITED MOST OF THE RANGES HAVE BEEN CLOSED THESE
LAWS ENACTED TO CONTROL CRIME BUT ONLY CONTROL THE LAW ABIDING LEAVING THE ONLY PERSONS WITH THE RIGHT TO HAVE FIREARMS THE CRIMINALS AND THE GOVERNMENT SADLY THE SHEEPEOPLE HAVE BEEN CONVINCED THEY HAVE NO RIGHTS OR NEED FOR THE BILL OF RIGHTS AND ARE
ENJOYING THEIR BREAD AND CIRCUS JEFFERSONIAN MADISIOAN REPUBLICS
REQUIRES THE ABILITY FOR COGNITIVE
THOUGHT AND PERSONAL INVOLVEMENT

og said...

Looks the brother of mine, which has a similarly sized wood grip. Mine is some newer, and I have shot a lot of 22 lr in it with no ill effect. it has a timing problem for which I have found a relatively simple solution.

Old NFO said...

That's a pretty one! Looks like it's in great shape!!!

Anonymous said...

Nice gun. I have a .38 Singapore Webley break top. Funny to see a revolver with a safety. Do they make speedloaders or moon clips for your .22?

William the CPA

Roberta X said...

I don;t know about speedloaders; they're not terribly common for the odder .22 revolvers. I found one for my S&W Combat Masterpiece but it's a six-shooter.

Given the number of .22 revolvers I own, if it ever comes down to having to reload them rapidly under pressure (that would be a very bad day), the thing to do would be to fill 'em all up, line 'em up and do "New York reloads," i.e., grab a fresh gun when the one it my hand is emptied.

Revolvers with safeties, manual ones are not unknown, especially in Europe -- in the U.S., the various S&W "lemon squeezer" Safety Hammerless uses a grip safety, not such a crazy idea for a pocket-carried revolver. Still, not what most people expect. Given the way Singapore is run, well, I don't expect the police there need to shoot much.

GreyLocke said...

I need to setup a deal with you to finish my Farmers Guns. The last 4 revolvers I looked at would require a bunch of parts that are hard to come by for a ridiculous price.

Roberta X said...

Older revolvers can be a dice roll and it's important to know what deals to pass up. After I had, over the course of three months, sent the gunsmiths at Coal Creek a Colt .32-20 with a terribly worn ratchet (one position wouldn't advance at all!) and two Iver Johnsons with damaged trigger return springs, they suggested to Tam that I needed instruction in checking them out. (Amazingly, they had a replacement spring for one of the Iver Johnsons.)

It sounds to me like you know what to avoid. You just need more opportunities to look. I started having better luck when I began going to all of the nearby smaller shows.

og said...

The biggest problems I have with the older top breaks are sights (or the relative lack therof) and the bluing. if you have one that has no valiue but would benefit from a reblue, you cannot, because convnetional chemistry leaves the steel purple. I have not yet found a process that will make them actually blue-black, though I sesarch and search.

Jim said...

Og, I went though the purple gun agony when I had a bluing setup. Sometimes a salt temperature a few degrees below normal would fix the problem.

The semi-sure fix is the "wipe-on and card-off" system with a vintage "browning" solution. I used Herter's Belgian Blue, said to be available now from Brownell's. It always worked for me on the old guns, but it takes a lot of time.

GreyLocke said...

I used to work for Nu-Line Guns in Harvester Missouri and The Gunsmith Shop in Florissant Missouri. At Nu-Line I did tune ups and reblued several hundred Mossberg 500's, at the Gunsmith Shop I worked on several hundred muzzleloaders and rechambered or lined about a dozen Stevens Visible Loaders, and built a lot of CVA 1851, 1860, 1861 Colts and 1858 Remington gun kits, in addition to general pre hunting season clean and tune ups of everything from Remington 870's to Winchester Model 70's. And Og, there is a bluing solution specifically for doubles which is lower temperature to keep from damaging the solder, which make a beautiful deep blue-black finish. I can't remember the name but when I worked at Nu-Line we got it from Brownell's, and it required de-ionized water to work right.