Saturday, September 15, 2012

Wheee! High-Wheeling!

I wrote a few days ago that there "...was a way to start small..." with pennyfarthing bicycles. It works pretty well. Not too rough on the pocketbook, either. Mind you, it takes some practice and at this point, I still struggle to not wobble the wheel too much, especially when controlling speed on a downhill. (The rear brake is more of a fond wish than a practical accessory.)

That's a 28" wheel in front and the little gadget turns heads wherever you ride it. A couple more photos and a bit more info over at Retrotechnologist.

20 comments:

Alan said...

COOL! I love it! :D

Alan said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Bob in Houston said...

Is there any adjustment to the seat hight? barely looks like its high enough to get a full leg extension out of, neat tho!

Turk Turon said...

You be careful on that thing!

Roberta X said...

Bob: Very little adjustment to seat height and you don't get full leg extension, not like you'd have on a safety bike or a full-size ordinary.

Alan: it's way fun!

Turk: It is a lot more stable than it looks.

Daniel E. Watters said...

Next, you'll want to get a Velo-Dog revolver to match.

pdb said...

Pimp. As. Hell.

og said...

lol. Very cool. Keep posting pics!

Keads said...

Very nice! What og said, more pics!

Oh, if you get the chance, I need some help. I humbly ask for your guidance. I have a blog post up about it. I invoked your Retrotech name. Email if you like. I need some help!

Bob said...

Looks more like 2/3 of a tricycle than a true pennyfarthing.

*grins*

CGHill said...

"The rear brake is more of a fond wish than a practical accessory."

I've seen some vintage cars of which something similar can be said.

The Jack said...

Haha Oh that's great!

It looks like a blast to ride.

Have you taken it down a big hill yet?

Roberta X said...

Nope, and not planning to any time soon. Not with the brakes -- no, brake -- it has, anyway.

GreyLocke said...

Please pics of you in period dress :o) (ducking and running)

Gewehr98 said...

Where's the "like" button on this confounded page? ;-)

Roberta X said...

There is some argument over what constitutes "period dress" for the lady bicyclist, especially approx. 1880 - 1900, before "safeties" replaced "ordinaries."

As a rule, in the early days women of taste and refinement rode large tricycles if they rode at all, vehicles with two large rear wheels, allowing a proper seat and properly modest attire. The wilder element -- probably suffragettes, or worse -- wore garments adapted from other outdoor pursuits, or a version of gentlemen's bicycling togs: high stockings, fitted over-the-knee breeches, blouse, jacket and visored cap. Later on, "bloomers" (an outer garment invented by Amelia Bloomer) were worn. Shocking! The drop-frame safety bicycle allowed the return of more ladylike styles, especially after chain guards and rear-wheel skirt guards were added.

The fellows had riding clubs, with distinctive uniform colors and ties; lady riders generally did not wear club uniform. (In modern times, this has changed.)

TSG said...

Good luck! Looks way too dangerous for me. I’ll stick with my 67 BSA Gold Star.

GreyLocke said...

Does that mean bloomers? ;o)

Roberta X said...

See above, Greylock. Or see here: "Bloomers" of the sort known as Rationals. ...Not that you won't still just leer.

;)

Roberta X said...

Better example.