Thursday, June 02, 2011

On Politics, Activism And Blog Content

I've been mostly talkin' about small, personal things of late and there's a reason for it. No, I haven't given up, quite the reverse.

I think there's a tsunami coming. While Claire is talking hyperinflation in the linked post, I wouldn't bet against a long, slow downhill slide instead of an abrupt change of slope. I don't see much recognition of the problem from the fed.gov or the leading and lesser lights of either party (except, perhaps, R0n P4u1) and no grasp whatsoever of the magnitude of the current and likely future problem.

There's not much I can do about it. Help keep Roseholme stocked with long-term storable foods and drygoods, assist in gardening as much as I can (we are woefully behind; though Tam claims to not have much of a green thumb, she's a veritable Mother Nature compared to me: I've got more of a brass thumb).

I don't think sign-waving or writing to Congresscritters will help. Nor is it the kind of issue that could be fixed by a few strategic "rooftop vetoes." Can't fix it at the ballot box, either; while I'd like to think a healthy outcome of Bad Times would be a greater diversity of choices for voters, that won't happen until (unless) things have already gone bad -- at which point any Huey Long promising a new car in every pot plus two chickens in the garage is liable to drown out opponents with notions for a long-term solution.

So I'm keeping the knives sharp, the pantry stocked and ammunition on hand; I've got my sewing machine and leatherworking kit, electronics workshop and vehicle repair tools (I'm stocking scooter parts as I can. With gas over $4.00 a gallon again, it's a better choice than any car). I hope to get by. I stopped thinking about retirement a long time ago; the dirty, class-war commies of AARP have started sending me their nasty little invites (pathetically early: "Give me the middle-aged adult and I'll own the senior citizen," perhaps?) but for my generation there is unlikely to be any easy dozing on the porch; Social Security will be bankrupt or its dollars valueless, other retirement funds eaten away by inflation; marketable skills are the only thing I know to hold real value -- and many of those become less relevant as technology shifts (when was the last time you saw a TV repair shop?) .

Thus I talk about things closer to home, down to earth. Simple joys like the antics of a cat. When the politicians are on something of interest, like firearm laws or other Constitutionally-protected activities, I comment. I'm not going to try to tell you how to get out of this mess, 'cos I have no idea.

Water runs downhill and the two big parties sweat over diverting it a few degrees to the left or right, both hotly denying it'll ever reach bottom. They're dreaming but the nightmare will be ours. No Congressman will miss a meal, no bureaucrat, nobody in the Executive or Judicial branches is gonna have to choose between the gas bill and the electric bill. I strongly suspect for the rest of us, if that's as bad as it ever gets, that'll be a good outcome.

5 comments:

Joshkie said...

Those with the ability to fix/repair things will make out ok.

No more disposable economy.

Oh well, it was fun while it lasted.

Josh

Bubblehead Les. said...

Skills are very useful. Try to get some Medical Skills in your Kit. Check out the Red Cross classes, then see if your Community College has any offerings. Inventory your stocks, and replace anything that has an Upcoming Expiration Date BEFORE you eat it. One In, THEN One Out! And don't forget the Plain Bleach and extra Fire Extinguishers! Up here in Breda Land, Cleveland just laid off over 100 Firemen and Police, yet they still have money for their "Community Services".

And with your Electronic Skills, get some Solar Panels to Charge up Batteries. LED Flashlights are a lot better in Emergency Times than Candles and their Fire Hazard, provided they have Juice.

Hope this helps.

Drang said...

RE: Junk mail from AARP. Go to the Direct Marketing Association's DMAchoice site and opt out of junk mail. It's voluntary on the part of the marketer, but AARP has never sent me a piece of junk mail, and I passed their threshold, so to speak, a while ago.

Quizikle said...

Physical gold and silver. I suspect pre-1964 US coins will be worth their weight...in silver - or maybe gold.

Certainly more than post-2000 coins which will be worth their weight in paper once we all agree they're only good as slugs for the laundromat.

A pre-1982 penny has about 2.5 cents of copper content; a pre-1964 quarter has about $6.50 of silver; a 1964 dime is worth about $2.60.

That's the inflation figure: 10 cents today is 1/26 of what it was in 1964.

Bubblehead Les is right: solar power. Not cost effective today, but cost isn't an issue when the power grid goes down.

Q

LauraB said...

I feel your pain, so to speak, sick of vapid crap in the midst of impending tragedy. We've prepared well, we've options. But there is a kind of sentimental touching of knicknacks, glancing at delicate china, knowing it will all be useless.

Hold to beauty, hold to goodness, find good people, and expect the worst.